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Berlin: Senate Administration Again Prohibits Terrorist’s Participation in Event

For the second time within two weeks, Berlin’s Senate has banned Palestinian terrorist Rasmea Odeh from taking part in political events. According to the foreigners’ registration office, the ban is valid until Odeh leaves the Federal Republic of Germany.

In the early afternoon, a Senate spokesman had told The Berlin Spectator the city state would not let Mrs. Odeh participate in a meeting in which she was scheduled to speak, without going into details about possible police operations.

In this case, Rasmea Odeh was invited by an organization called ‘Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network’. She was supposed to appear at the gathering at 7:00 p.m.. According to the organizers the event was supported by numerous organizations, including the Berlin division of the BDS movement.

The German Residence Act says, political activities of foreign nationals can be “constrained or forbidden” if the participation might “endanger the political decision-making process in Germany” or disturb “the peaceful coexistence of foreigners and Germans.” The same applies when public safety might be threatened.

At the ‘be’kech’ café in Berlin’s ‘Exerzierstraße‘, several small buses with police officers arrived on site an hour in advance. Once the event had commenced, police commander Meckelburg told The Berlin Spectator, the participants were cooperating. He expected “a nice event, but one without Mrs. Odeh.”

A lady from the immigration office was going to hand over an official ban document to Rasmea Odeh, who was supposed to be deported almost two weeks ago. But her pro-terror friends started fighting the deportation order at Berlin courts, prolonging the procedure.

Leon Kanner and Eddie Joffe were murdered in a 1969 terror attack Rasmea Odeh was involved in.

At the ‘be’kech’ café, a speaker said Rasmea Odeh “cannot be here today.” She accused “media controlled by fascists and Zionists” of being responsible for the ban. Also she bashed Israel, which is the usual approach at events of this kind, but refrained from mentioning Hamas’ attacks, the latest riot against the terror organization in Gaza, previous attacks and a war Hamas forced Israel into, or the murders her idol Odeh is responsible for.

In front of the venue, Lars Umanski, the chairman of the Jewish Students’ Union, said his organization had written an e-mail to the ‘be’kech’ café, asking the owners to refrain from giving an open stage to the terrorist. He said he appreciated the ban Berlin had imposed on Mrs. Odeh, but added the city should have done more. The event at that Berlin café should never have taken place, Umanski stated.

The Berlin-based NGO ‘WerteInitiative’ released a statement saying it appreciated the fact that the German democracy had been protective in the Odeh case.

The week before last, Odeh had been banned from joining political events before. “Berlin is an open-minded and tolerant city, which will not provide room for extremist propaganda”, Berlin’s Governing Mayor Müller, a Social Democrat, had said. “Anti-Israeli and antisemitic resentments, packaged in liberation rhetoric” would not be accepted.

In 1969, Odeh took part in a terror attack in which two Israeli students, Leon Kanner and Eddie Joffe, were murdered. She also participated in a second attack. Afterwards, she got a life sentence in Israel, but was freed after ten years as part of a prisoner exchange. Recently, she was deported from the United States of America for lying about her past.