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Germany: Foreign Minister Maas Wishes Muslims Blessed ‘Eid ul-Fitr’

On the occasion of Eid ul-Fitr, the day of breaking the fast after Ramadan, Germany’s Foreign Minister Heiko Maas sent best wishes to all practicing Muslims. In his greeting, he mentioned difficulties caused by Corona, and “conflicts”.

Berlin, May 13th, 2021 (The Berlin Spectator) — In his greeting to practicing Muslims on Eid ul-Fitr, Foreign Minister Heiko Maas mentioned a problem the entire world is trying to resolve, namely Corona. He refrained from including the ongoing war of terror against Israel directly. But he did say pandemics did not stop conflicts, and that solidarity with fellow human beings was important.

Support for Fellow Humans

This is the official English version of Maas’s greeting, word by word:

“A the end of Ramadan, I would like to wish Muslims the world over “Eid Mubarak”, a blessed Festival of the Breaking of the Fast. 2021 is now the second year in which the celebrations are being overshadowed by the global COVID‑19 pandemic. In the past year, the entire world was faced by great challenges and restrictions of unimaginable proportions, which have taken us all to the limit and beyond.”

“At this difficult time, the fundamental idea expressed by Eid ul‑Fitr – solidarity with and support for our fellow human beings – is becoming all the more important. I hope that this will not only be acted out between individuals, but also at the level of the greater international community, both in terms of the equitable distribution of vaccines and our efforts to support the victims of numerous conflicts worldwide.”

Hostilities and Disasters

“After all, the second Eid ul‑Fitr since the outbreak of the COVID‑19 pandemic unfortunately also reminds us that pandemics do not stop any conflicts. On the contrary, where humanitarian needs are particularly great, they are further exacerbated by the illness. My thoughts are therefore especially with those who are unable to celebrate the breaking of the fast owing to hostilities, natural disasters, displacement and forced migration and sickness right now. Rest assured that Germany will not slacken its efforts to seek an end to conflicts and to support humanitarian assistance for those in need.”

Today, 5.3 to 5.6 million Muslims live in the Federal Republic of Germany. Their percentage in the population is 6.4 to 6.7 percent. Up to 300,000 Muslims live in Berlin.